Print AND Digital

Love booksPrint

I love books. Of course, I am librarian! I think each book is a treasure, a gift.

I enjoy the tactile experience, the paper softness, its smell.

I can lend a book, give it forward, I remember who gifted me which book, I may hug it even!

Their materiality give them context, a significance, therefore a stronger memory.

Most importantly, I love reading books. I enjoy diving into the pages in precious dedicated times. Losing myself in a book, forgetting time, living someone else life, being rocked by the rhythm of the words…

I also read print (alias a knowledge book) to learn a subject in depth, exploring all its aspects and nuances, often re-reading a difficult or important part to take it in. Oh! And they don’t have advertising!

Reading onlineDigital

I am an avid online reader too. But I can’t say I love it.

Online is where I get a lot of information, everything I want to know and more.

I explore the world and worldviews, I get news and weather of course. I keep contact with my friends, my community, and read many things I do not need.

Snippets, snapshots. Quick. Easy.

I read articles too, I skim-read the page to see if it’s what I want to read, then click away or continue skim reading. I tend to skip the end when articles are too long. Or my phone beeps and off I am.

Online reading has great advantages: ability to read in the dark, my phone of lighter than most books, it’s easy to find the information I want, it’s perfect when travelling and even saving paper!

As librarian, I witness first-hand how books in print are less and less used.  Is it a problem?

Reading Brain

Maryanne Wolf is a reading specialist. In her latest book, “The Reading Brain in a Digital World” she questions the future of the reading brain and our capacity for critical thinking, empathy, and reflection as we switch to online technologies.

Studies have shown that 85% of students multitask (=get distracted) in an online environment but only 26% when reading print.

Analyses of movements of the eyes when reading show that we scan through a screen (in the shape of an F) whereas eyes follow lines in a book. Trained to search and find words fast on webpages, we unconsciously practice speed-reading on a screen. So we read e-books faster! We look for the meaning, the plot, but miss the implicit, the depth and the literary expression.

Learning impact

So what about thinking, analyzing, evaluating? What does it mean for learning?

A study by Geoff Kaufman and Mary Flanagan says that for abstract (inference-based) questions, the print participants scored higher, on average, with 66 percent correct compared to the digital participants with just 48 percent correct. For concrete questions, digital participants out-scored the print participants: 73 percent correct versus 58 percent.

This study shows screens do not make us dumber as some people fear or blame.  But it does show that brains do not work the same way with print or screen.

Conclusion

I invite you to reflect on your reading habits, be aware of the differences print or digital offer and choose your reading medium accordingly.

It turns out that it’s no longer a Print VS Online debate, it is a Print AND Online world. We have to be bi-literate.

How do YOU read?

Check out the library display

Here at Mount Aspiring college library, there is a prominent display area right across the entrance.

Librarians hand-pick fiction and non-fiction books on a specific theme, usually in line with current events of the college.

Displays invite you to discover books you may not have looked for, yet might interest you, or be useful to you.

Displays are changed regularly so always give the display a glance and pick up a good book!

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Welcome to 2017!

Enjoy the library!

7100 Fiction books, 6520 Knowledge books, 500 picture books, 1264 Ebooks… Whatever your style, read read read!

The library is open Monday to Friday, 8.30 to 4pm, including interval and lunchtime. NO FOOD please.

Here is a quote I found during my summer reading in “The Well of Lost Plots” by Jasper Fforde (Check out this amazing, witty Thursday Next series – FFO).

After all, reading is arguably a far more creative and imaginative process than writing; when the reader creates emotion in their head, or the colours of the sky during the setting sun, or the smell of a warm summer’s breeze on their face, they should reserve as much praise for themselves as they do for the writer – perhaps more.”

Offer a book to family members! (for teens)

christmas-treeTired of offering socks to your Dad or plastic things that break in 2mn? Well here are some cool, cheap and intelligent ideas:

Books!

Choose books on what they like, books recommended by a teacher (or ask the librarian), award-winning books, and books you would like them to read (for example how to stop yelling at your teen)! Head down to our local bookshop, at DOC or at Puzzling World or you can shop online on Wheelers (cheap and user-friendly).

Magazine subscription

Buy the latest issue of your parent’s favourite magazine. Before you wrap it up, look for the subscription page and subscribe for the time you can afford, maybe 3 months, maybe a year. Get help from the other parent for payment. S/he’ll love it and will be impressed with your thoughtfulness.

Book related items

Bookmarks: there are plenty of beautiful bookmarks in the shops or you can get crafty and make your own. You can find materials for very cheap at Wastebusters and there will be a workshop on Monday 5th December from 4pm – 5.30pm to create hand-made recycled gifts.

CTH thumbthing01.jpgBook things: Book covers, bookends, book holders, book jewels are available from local shops or online at NZ Book Lover. For example, this handy bookmark/hold-your-book-with-one-hand devices is only $9.

bedside-lamp

Book lamps: we need a good light to read in the evening. Consider a cheap simple lamp and clamp lamp (with soft blue or neutral tones LED approx 4 Watt), available locally from Mitre 10.

If your budget is bigger, one of these smart and sleek reading lamps are sure to impress and delight!

The Lumio Lamp: A book, lamp, portable

lumio_product_maple_1

http://www.hellolumio.com/shop

The LiliLite: A shelf, Lamp and bookmark!

booklamp

http://www.lililite.com/#lililite

And remember to add a book or book series on your Christmas list, reading is good for you!

 

 

 

 

 

Books and book stuff to your teen for Christmas (for parents)

bookschristmasOffering a book for Christmas prevents the “Summer slide” and is a great way to show you value books and reading. So head down to the bookshop and stroll the shelves. What to choose?

  • A book of the genre your teen likes
  • A series is a great gift as it is difficult to get them all in order from libraries.
  • An award-winning book, they are actually usually good
  • Books to Films are popular eg. Mortal Engine, by Philip Pullman
  • A book to convey a message, eg. Life of Pi
  • A useful book, eg. cooking or fitness (for teens)

If you don’t know, go book shopping with your child, it is a great way to talk books, what s/he likes, what you like or offer a book voucher.001

I like to make hamper presents that include a book. It demonstrates actively the usefulness and ubiquity of reading. For example:

  • a learn-to-knit book in a basket with wool and needles
  • a learn-to-fish book with a fishing rod and kit
  • bike maintenance or bike skills with a new bike

Other ways to reinforce the love for books is to offer book-related items, bookmarks, bookends, bookstands… but also fancy book covers, book jewels, decorations or book paraphernalia. For example book earrings will tell your girl: “I know you’re a great book lover, I value that and it suits you well”. You’ll find ideas at the bookshop, at DOC or online on Wheelers for books. Explore NZ Book Lovers and Ex-Libris crafts for other book-related gifts.

 

Readers live longer!

After surveying 3,635 people aged 60 and up about their health, Yale University School of Public Health researchers discovered that people who read books for 30mn or more per day live 2 years longer than non-readers!

Reading books works better than magazines and newspapers.

Reading more than 3 hours and a half per day bring a 6% advantage compared to those who read more than 30mn.

(Full study here http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953616303689)

I’ve told you reading is good for you !

Awesome Graphic Novels

Graphic Novels are a great way to read and read more. They offer a progression to more words and more complex stories, of course supported by graphics that help comprehension and offer a rich experience.

Historically disdained as US Comics used to be mainly about superheroes, graphic novels have evolved to a rich and valuable reading material.BD selection in France European graphic novel culture is incredibly varied and creative. In every bookshop, there is an extensive Comics or Bande dessinées (BD) section and many towns have  their graphic novel shop. There are 2 major Festivals that honour and reward graphic novels and artists, the Lucca Comics and Games festival in Italy coming up in October and the International Festival “de la Bande dessinee” in Angouleme, which is more than 40 years old! The Comic Strip museum in Belgium gives an idea of the variety and magnitude of the “9th Art“.

In New Zealand, graphic novels regularly make it in the book awards finalists and bestsellers. Click here to open an excellent history and review of NZ graphic novels.

Picture booksTherefore here at MAC, the graphic novel section is steadily expending, with new graphic novel series and stand alone:

Come to the library and dive in a good BD!

Quick find for books

Awesome book return box

Awesome book return boxAwesome book hovermark

Did you find a book awesome and wish to spread the word? Then drop it in the Awesome Book Return Box. The book will receive an AWESOME hovermark and will proudly stand out on the shelves. And when choosing a book, look out for
AWESOME hovermarks. If somebody found a book awesome, chances are you will too.

 

GrababookGrababook!

If you are still not sure what to read or you have no time to choose a book, then take one from the Grababook box conveniently placed on the issue desk. The librarian fills it with favourite and sure-to-please popular books.

Holiday reading

Holidays are a great time to read. Time at last! However, all the library books have to be back to the library to be stock taken and are not available over the summer.

Instead, visit the town library and find a book to enjoy from their great collection. And sign up to the Summer reading challenge, from the 19th December. Prizes to win!

Or use our online ebook library. There are now 150 ebooks readable on any device, for all ages and interests, free for our students and staff.

Christchurch City Libraries publishes lists of recommended holiday reading.

Enjoy reading! Enjoy your holidays!